Results tagged ‘ Mike Scoisia ’

What Could Have Been, and What Is.

Before I start endlessly analyzing and fretting over the Hot Stove rumors, I want to talk about what is right before us: the League Championship Series. We have plenty of time to talk about the former–the void between the end of the postseason, and Spring Training. I have enjoyed watching these series even though the National League Championship Series didn’t end the way I wanted it to. 

I was completely surprised that the Dodgers lost in only five games. To be honest, I didn’t think they would get past the powerhouse of the Cardinals, let alone sweep them. With guys like Chris Carpenter, Adam Wainwright, Matt Holliday, and Albert Pujols, I thought that the Cardinals would have gone a lot further than they actually did. They had the caliber to be in and to win the World Series, but fate just didn’t have it that way. I thought they had Game 2 (I think it was?) in the bag when there were two outs and an easy fly ball was hit to Matt Holliday, but instead of catching it to win the ball game (and perhaps instill some confidence in the Cardinals), it hit him right in the crotch. 
The Dodgers seemed to have luck on their side, and it was a 2008 NLCS re-match. The Phillies may have an emerging postseason legend in Cliff Lee and the ego-maniacal Cole Hamels whose pride from winning the World Series last season seemed to cloud his ability to pitch well, but the Dodgers have a deep lineup, a good starting five and a fabulous bullpen. I really wanted the Dodgers to advance to the World Series as well because I knew that regardless of whomever won the ALCS, the World Series would be enticing as long as the Dodgers were there. 
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Had the Dodgers advanced, they would have played either the Angels or the Yankees. If it was a matchup between the Dodgers and Angels, we would have had the first “subway series” since the one in New York in 2000. This subway series would have meant that I would have been up until roughly 2 am every morning, sleepwalking my way through school. Yet the intensity that arises from a series like this is so alluring, that a lack of sleep would have been well worth it. It’s almost like a civil war, and it will augment the rivalry between the two teams like nothing else can. 
Not that I would ever root for the Yankees, but if the Dodgers were representing the National League, I can’t say I would have minded too much if the Yankees were to advance. It would have been Joe Torre vs Joe Girardi. The Yankee manager that was fired for his supposed inability to advance the Yankees to the World Series despite their winning four World Championships under his leadership. 
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I’d like to talk about that for a second. I thought that whole scenario was completely ridiculous. I may be a Red Sox fan, but I have no problem admitting that Joe Torre is one hell of a manager. The same way that I can admit that I cheered for Derek Jeter when he surpassed Lou Gehrig, and the way that I consider Mariano Rivera a God; I consider Joe Torre a superb manager. I understand when managers are fired because their teams play miserably and are in last place, but I don’t understand when managers are fired despite their team getting to the postseason. Getting to the postseason is an honor–only 8 teams out of 30 do it a year–and a manager should be honored for that (most of the time) not scolded for their team’s failings. *Note: the whole Grady Little leaving Pedro in is another story*
Anyway, the Dodgers vs Yankees would have been a great matchup, and of course I would have been rooting for the Dodgers even though it hurts me to see Manny Ramirez’s postseason heroics. 
Instead of dwelling over what could have been, I suppose it’s best to look at what we have at hand: the Phillies advanced to the World Series, and Game 6 between the Angels and the Yankees is tonight. I don’t like the Phillies. I root for the Marlins because I live in South Florida, and the Phillies are the Marlins’ division rivals. I may be a bit jealous because the Phillies did what the Red Sox failed to do last year–advance to the World Series for the second year in a row (please don’t hate me Phillies fans, I respect your team nonetheless). They could be the first team since the Yankees to repeat World Series victories, and the second team this decade to have two World Series victories (the first, of course, was the Red Sox). I guess it’s just that having the Phillies in the World Series doesn’t excite me as much as the Dodgers would have. 
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Tonight, I’m rooting for the Angels–just like I have been for the entire ALCS. Although it’s hard to admit, they played better baseball than the Red Sox did. I know that they are a good team, and I know that they have what it takes to beat the Yankees. It is so foreign to me to be rooting for Bobby Abreu since I’ve always had something against him for taking Juan Pierre’s spot in the All-Star game a couple of years ago (the fact that he played for the Yankees only augmented this feeling). Torii Hunter’s ego may bother me, but I know that he’s a fabulous center fielder, and a great team leader. Lackey pitched his heart out in Game 5, and Mike Scoscia made a huge mistake in taking him out (for the record Scoscia is probably my least favorite manager in the Majors). Out of the teams that remain, I want the Angels to win. I want them to win it for Nick Adenhart, because that would be beyond baseball. 
The one interesting thing about having the Phillies in the World Series is that whoever wins from among the three teams that remain, that team will have two World Series victories in this decade. The Yankees won it in 2000, the Angels won it in 2002, and the Phillies won it last year. The question is, who will it be? And it is that unanswered question that keeps me watching baseball. 

Beginning of the Season Blues

As fans, I think that we tend to expect the best from our teams, especially at the beginning of the season–it’s only natural. There have been so many predictions that I think they eventually go to our heads, and we get ahead of ourselves because we focus on the end result rather than each and every game. 

This doesn’t mean I’m comfortable with starting out at 2-5 at all, the Red Sox worst start to the season since 1996. In fact, I barely shut up about it today. I guess that’s just a mix of me being tired from staying up late to watch all the West Coast games, and trying to figure out why we can’t score runs. 
Speaking of West Coast games, it seems like the Red Sox are getting a nice early dosage of those. That doesn’t really help me get my sleeping pattern back in order after Spring Break, but the games are obviously more important to me. 
The Almost-Brawl 
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It did not take long for this game to get exciting. In fact, it started in the bottom of the first. Chone Figgins has just hit a double (I think) and Bobby Abreu was at-bat. I really dislike Bobby Abreu, but not for the reason you think. In 2004, I wanted Juan Pierre to go to the All-Star game, and it was between him and Abreu (who was on the Phillies at this time). I spent an hour voting for Pierre over and over again, but Abreu was the one who went. I never forgave him, and going to the Yankees didn’t really help his case. 
Anyway, Beckett was taking forever to make the pitch because he kept looking back at Figgins. I was expecting Abreu to call time any second now, and I bet Beckett was waiting for Abreu to call time too– maybe even provoking him with the long wait. 
But Abreu decided to wait until the last possible second to make the call, and by last possible second I mean that Beckett was already in his windup. I hate it when batters do that. Beckett ended up throwing in the vicinity of Bobby Abreu’s head, even though Varitek called for the pitch low and away. 
First of all, I think that Abreu has been in the league long enough to know that Beckett isn’t the calmest guy in the world. He’s got a temper. It’s just not wise to call time on a guy like Beckett. 
Second, anything can happen when you call time in the middle of someone’s windup. It’s not like he can stop in the middle of his windup, I cannot have this man injured for the sake of my own personal health. When a pitcher’s concentration is broken, the ball can go anywhere. 
Abreu started mouthing off at Beckett first, and you don’t want to get Beckett angry by any means. Luckily, no punches were thrown but both sides were out on the field. A few Angels got tossed including Torii Hunter, Spier, and Sciosia. And according to Torii Hunter, what upset him wasn’t something said by the Red Sox. 
Beckett was not as dominating as his first start, but I wasn’t too disappointed with the outing itself. The Sox continued to frustrate me when they could not do anything about the runners that they had on base. I wasn’t able to see the last couple of innings though, I had to go out to dinner. But luckily, my dad found Gameday on his phone, so I was able to read that JD Drew struck out looking to end the ninth. Apparently, it was outside… but I did not watch so I can’t go on a rant. 
Late West Coast Games
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Baseball games aren’t really convenient when they start at 10:05 pm. I’ve figured out my whole ‘how-to-stay-awake’ routine. Two cups of coffee and keeping the light on normally works. Plus, tweeting away my woes helps out too. 
I think I’ve figured out that Jon Lester really isn’t an April guy. I remember not being very impressed with him at the beginning of last year, but then in May… well, you know the rest. It’s not like Jon Lester isn’t talented… it’s just one bad inning that kind of takes away from the rest of the night. 
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The worst was Nomar’s home run. The best way to describe my feelings towards Nomar is “emotional attachment”. It’s hard to let it all go, especially after everything he did with the Red Sox. His first career home run in September of 1996 happened to be against the Oakland A’s. And now, his first time playing against the Red Sox he hits a home run as a member of the A’s. 
And as Ian Browne pointed out in his blog, it was a bit eerie seeing him and Orlando Cabrera playing on the same side of the field. For those of you who don’t know the story, Orlando Cabrera was the shortstop that replaced took over for Nomar. And the Red Sox have never had a solid shortstop since. 

The Morning After
I probably came to school today with the most desolate look that I have had since the Red Sox lost the ALCS. Kathleen, the only Red Sox fan friend I have at my school, and I raved and raved about being 2-5. We wrote a haiku, and created our own lineups during classes. 
First period math today, I was forced to talk about the poor start to the season. I reported the scores to my teacher, and told him about Nick Swisher pitching (which I find hilarious, by the way). 
“How did the Red Sox do?”
“I don’t want to talk about it.”
Another person in the class offers to look it up on his phone, but it’s not like I need him reciting the grim box score out loud. 
My teacher claims he is going to look it up anyway: “Fine. It was 8-2″ I conceded
“Oh, I see why you didn’t want to talk about it. Nomar hit the home–” 
I sighed… Nomar, Nomar, Nomar. I am sorry. 
Suspensions
I found out after school today that Beckett got suspended for six games, for throwing at Abreu’s head. I don’t remember Joba Chamberlain getting suspended for six games after throwing at Kevin Youkilis’ head. In fact, I don’t even remember Youkilis charging the mound. And I don’t remember Terry Francona being difficult and refusing to go back to the dugout the way that Mike Sciosia did. 
Two cups of coffee again for me tonight, but hopefully I’ll be able to report happier news to my first period class tomorrow. 
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